How to Play Euchre

At one time, Euchre was the most popular of any card game played in the United States. It is still quite popular, great fun and widely played in many locales.

The standard game of Euchre is played by 4 players, in two partnerships consisting of two players each. It is played with the Euchre deck which is a modified standard deck consisting of 32 cards. This deck consists of one card from each suit (♠,,,♣) in the following denominations: Ace, King, Queen, Jack, 10, 9, 8 and 7. The ranking of these cards for the game of Euchre is, from highest to lowest, A, K, Q, J, 10, 9, 8, 7. However, the ranking of cards may change somewhat in certain suits dependant on the suit specified as the trump suit for each hand (see below).

Partners in Euchre should sit directly across from each other
Partners should sit directly across from each other at the table when playing Euchre. Thus, players one and three would play as partners against the opponent team consisting of players two and four.
Unless partnerships have been prearranged in some manner, the first order of business should be to determine the partnerships and the first dealer. All four players should draw one card from the shuffled, face down deck. The players drawing the two lowest cards become partners against the players drawing the two lowest cards. The player drawing the very lowest card (according to the standard ranking) becomes the first dealer. During this draw, if two or more players draw equally ranked cards, these players should draw again. If they again draw a card matching another player, these players would continue drawing until all players have cards of different denominations. The partnerships, once determine, will then remain until the end of the game, at which time new partnerships can be decided. The partnerships should seat themselves at the table directly across from each other, such that the play of the hand will alternate between members of each partnership.

After the partnerships are determined as well as the first dealer, the first dealer would then thoroughly shuffle the deck and offer it to the opponent at his right hand to cut. This player will cut and then return the deck to the dealer. The dealer will then proceed to deal the hands to the players. Beginning with the player to his immediate left, he will distribute the cards to each player. Each player should receive five cards face down. This can be done by first dealing a round of three cards in rotation around the table and then a batch of two, or this can be reversed with a batch of two then followed by a batch of three. Once each player has five cards, the dealer will then deal the next card face up from the deck onto the table. This card, depending on the course of the bidding phase of the hand, may indicate the trump suit for the hand.

Determination of trump suit: Beginning at the player to the dealers immediate left and continuing clockwise around the table, the players will then have the opportunity to declare if they want to make the turned up card the trump suit (this is called the turn up). This continues with each player, including dealer who is last, having this opportunity to decide if the turned up cards suit will be the trump suit for the hand. If any player indicates this suit should be the trump suit, the play of the hand begins. At this point the dealer immediately discards any one card from his hand face down under the undealt remainder of the pack and takes the turned up card into his hand.

However, if all four players decline the suit of the turned up card as the trump suit, a round of "bidding" begins, again starting with the player to the dealers immediate left. Starting with that player, and continuing in a clockwise rotation, each player has one opportunity to designate a suit of their choice as the trump suit. Obviously, no player may declare the trump suit to be the same as that originally turned up and declined by all players. As soon as any player in his proper turn names a suit, this "bidding" round immediately ends and play of the hand begins. In this case, the dealer does not take the turned up card into his hand, instead leaving it in it's place and turning it face down. During this round of bidding a player is not obligated to name a suit and may pass, not declaring any suit. If all four players pass, the cards are thrown in, the cards shuffled and deal passes to the next player with no score occurring for this hand. Whichever way the trump suit is determined, the partnership of the player who either "accepted" it or declared it is now considered the "maker".

The Trump Suit and Ranking of Cards: The trump suit determined will have an effect on the ranking and number of cards within that suit as well as the other suit of same color as the trump suit. For the hand, the Jack of this other suit of the same color is actually considered to be part of the trump suit. Thus, for all purposes during the hand, this Jack should be considered a trump suit and played in any circumstance calling for the play of a card from the trump suit. It is no longer considered a portion of it's original suit for this hand. Thus the ranking of the cards in this trump suit are as follows (from high to low): Jack of the trump suit, Jack of opposite suit (but same color) as trump suit, King of trump suit, Queen of trump suit, Ten of trump suit, 9 of trump suit, 8 of trump suit and 7 of trump suit. The ranking of the cards in the opposite suit is as follows (with the Jack no longer being considered to be included in this suit): Ace, King, Queen, 10, 9, 8, 7. In the two suits of the alternate color, the standard Euchre ranking of the cards applies (A, K, Q, J, 10, 9, 8, 7).

Sample of trump suit if Spades were trump
Example trump suit in Euchre if Spades were set as the trump suit for the hand.

As an example, say that Spades has been declared to be the trump suit. In this case, the trump suit would consist of the following cards, in order from highest to lowest; Jack of ♠, Jack of ♣, Ace of ♠, King of ♠, Queen of ♠, 10 of ♠, 9 of ♠, 8 of ♠, 7 of ♠. The members and ranking of the Club suit for this hand (from high to low) would be as follows: Ace of ♣, King of ♣, Queen of ♣, 10 of ♣, 9 of ♣, 8 of ♣, 7 of ♣.
Opposite suit ranking (with Spades as trump)
Example of the opposite suit (in this case Clubs) if Spades were trump.
The ranking of the cards within the Diamond () and Heart () suits would be in this case, from high to low; Ace, King, Queen, Jack, 10, 9, 8, 7. See the illustration above which shows an example in which Spades has been declared the trump suit for the hand.

Play of the Hand: After the trump suit is so determine, the game is now played out in a series of 5 tricks. The makers partnership attempts to win as many of these tricks as possible while the opposing partnership attempts to "set" the makers partnership by preventing them from winning these tricks. The player to the dealers immediate left leads the first card to the first trick (which may be any card of his choice from his hand). The play to the trick then proceeds in a clockwise rotation, with each player playing one card to the trick on their turn. Each player must play a card of the same suit as was led to the trick if able. However, if they do not have a card of the suit led, they may play a trump card to the trick if they possess one. If they do not have a card of the trump suit, or choose not want to play one, they may play a card of any other suit to the trick. The highest trump card played to the trick wins it. If no trump was played to the trick, the highest card of the suit led to the trick wins it. If a card of the trump suit was led to the trick, each player must play a card of the trump suit to the trick if they so have one. However, while abiding by these requirements, a player is under no specific compulsion to attempt to win any particular trick (by say, playing his highest trump card), if his personal strategy does not dictate so. The winner of the trick should remove these cards from play and leads the first card to the next trick. These cards won in tricks but should be removed from play (face down), but should be noted which partnership won the trick to determine if that partnership was able to win the required number of tricks in the hand.

Solo Play: The player who originally determined the trump suit for the hand, the maker, may indicate he wants to play the hand alone. He indicates this by stating he will "Go Alone". In this case, his partner should immediately discard his hand face down to the table, with he or his cards taking no further part in the current hand. The maker will then play the hand by himself against both players of the opposing partnership. In this case the player to the makers immediate left leads to the first trick. Playing alone can increase the scoring possibilities on the hand for the maker, but is also much more difficult as the maker must play without any help from his partner during the hand.

Scoring: After all five tricks have been played, the scoring of the hand then proceeds, with the following scoring possibilities:
  • If the maker's partnership (with both partners playing) wins all five tricks (called march) that partnership scores 2 points while the opposing partnership scores nothing.
  • If the maker playing solo wins all five tricks (also called march) the partnership scores 4. The opponent's partnership scores nothing.
  • If the maker's partnership (with both partners playing) wins three or four tricks the partnership scores 1 point and the opponent partnership scores nothing.
  • If the maker playing solo wins three or four tricks, the partnership would score 1 point and the opposing partnership scores nothing.
  • If the maker's partnership (with both partners participating in the hand or with the maker playing solo) wins less then three tricks the opponent's partnership scores 2 points. The maker's partnership is said to have been euchred and scores nothing on the hand.
The first partnership to score 5 or more accumulated points over the course of multiple hands is declared the winners of the game. For a longer game, some players prefer to increase the required winning total to 7 or even 10 points. As in similar games such as Contract Bridge and Whist, Euchre is sometimes played in rubbers. When played thusly, the partnerships would remain the same for the duration of the rubber. The first partnership to win two games wins the rubber.

Score Indicators: For convenience, the current score for each partnership in Euchre is often and traditionally displayed by using some of the unused lower ranked cards from a deck, with the number of spots or pips displayed indicating a partnerships current score. Thus, in a 5 point game, two unused threes and fours from the deck would be used by each partnership to mark their score. The following illustration shows the representation of each scoring total a partnership might have.

Scoring Markers for Euchre

Euchre Vocabulary: Euchre has a number of words and phrases that are often used by regulars of the game. Below are some of the more common terms that a Euchre player may encounter:

- When a solo player or partnership scores all 5 possible points in a hand, this is called march.
- When a solo player or partnership wins less than 3 tricks in a hand, they are said to have been euchred (which earns the opposing partnership 2 points).
- The Jack of the trump suit which is the highest card in the deck is called right bower.
- The Jack of the other suit of the same color as the trump suit, which is considered the second highest card of the trump suit, is called the left bower.
- If an opponent accepts the turn up cards suit as trump for the hand, this is usually indicated by the player saying I order it up.
- If the partner of dealer accepts the turn up card as the suit designator for trump, this player usually indicates this by saying I assist.
- If the dealer accepts the turn up card as the trump suit designator, he usually does not say anything, but usually just indicates this by exchanging a card for the turn up card. This is called taking it up.
- If the dealer refuses the turn-up when all other players have also, this is called turning it down.
- If a player declares as trump the alternate suit of the same color as that originally turned up, this is called making it next.
- When a suit of the opposite color as that originally turned up but rejected as trump is selected to be the trump suit for the hand, this is called crossing it.


Optional Rules and Euchre Variations

Euchre for varying number of players

Euchre for Three: Three handed Euchre (also called Cutthroat Euchre) is played very similar to the standard four player game described above. Each player is dealt the same number of cards in the same manner, and bidding proceeds amongst the three players as normal. The major difference for three players, is that the maker always plays solo against the other two players. Thus, the scoring for three handed Euchre is as follows: All other rules are played the same as in standard four hand Euchre described above.

Euchre for Two: This variation is also very similar to standard four hand Euchre, with a few differences:
- From the special Euchre pack additional cards are removed. All sevens and eights are removed from this pack, leaving a 24 card deck. The ranking of cards (for both trump suit and the non trump suits) remains the same as in standard Euchre minus the sevens and eights.
- Obviously, a player can never make the declaration "alone" as they are already playing solo.
- Scoring for two hand Euchre is as follows: All other aspects of two handed Euchre are the same as in standard, four hand Euchre.

Railroad Euchre

Railroad EuchreA number of differing variations were added to Euchre under the name Railroad Euchre. Most of these variations were designed to speed up the game, often such that a game could be completed on a short train commute. One or more of the following variant rules can be added, which will provide for a somewhat shorter game.

Joker Addition: One joker is added to the standard Euchre deck described above. This joker is considered the highest card of the trump suit, with the remainder of the trump suit (and all other suits) exactly the same as in standard Euchre.

Defending Alone: This version allows a defender to play alone if the maker opts to play alone. Either defender has the right to declare this, however the defender who is the first in line for the next deal in the hand has the first opportunity. If this happens, the other defender then places his hand face down on the table, not to be used in the hand. Scoring is the same as in standard Euchre, however if the lone defender is able to euchre the maker, his partnership scores 4 points.

Call for Best: In this variation, a lone player may discard one card face down to the table and call for his partners best card in replacement. If the Defending Alone rule is used, a lone defender can also ask for this privilege.

Laps: When playing using the Laps rule, a winning side may overlap any score over that needed for the game towards the next game. Thus, if a partnership had 4 points in a game to 5 and they were able to score march (win all five tricks) on the next hand they would score 2 points. One of these points would be used to win this game (total of 5) and the other point would be carried over to the next game giving them a start of 1 point for that game.

Slams: If a partnership wins a game before the other side has scored any points in this game, they are considered to have won two games rather than just one (a slam).

Jambon: This variant rule, sometimes called Ham Bone (which is how this option is usually pronounced), allows a player who is playing alone to elect to play with his entire hand face up, completely exposed on the table. A player able to score all 5 possible points for the hand (March) with his cards exposed in this way earns 8 points for the feat. He scores as normal for winning 3 or 4 tricks. Optionally, some players enforce the rule that the first opponent to the left of the Player can state the opening lead the Player must make from his exposed hand in the first trick.

Auction Euchre

Auction Euchre Auction Euchre is a variation of the basic game where there is no turn-up, with each player instead making one bid. The rank of cards (both in the trump suit and the other suits) is exactly the same as in standard Euchre. Auction Euchre can be played by 5, 6 or 7 players, with the specific rules for each given below:

Five Handed Auction Euchre: In five hand Auction Euchre the standard 32 card Euchre deck is used. To determine dealer and seating positions, each player should draw one card from the face down, spread deck. The player drawing the lowest card is the first dealer, the next lowest card sits to his immediate left, with the next lowest at that players left, and so on. After each hand, the deal passes to the next player in a clockwise rotation.
The dealer deals out the cards similarly to standard Euchre, in a batch of 3 face down cards to each player, then a batch of 2 or he may reverse the order. After all players have been dealt their hands, the dealer deals two more face-down cards to the center of the table as a widow.

After all cards have been dealt one round of bidding occurs. Each player is given one opportunity to bid, starting with the player to the dealers immediate left and going clockwise around the table. On his turn to bid a player either names a bid or may pass. His bid would indicate a number of points and his bid must be higher than any previous bid. The specific number bid will determine a number of things regarding the play of hand. See the table below for the allowable bids and what this bid contracts the player for in the hand. After each player has had one opportunity to bid, the player who bid the highest number now may name the trump suit. After doing so, he takes the two card widow into his hand and discards any two cards from his hand face down to the table, out of play.
If the bid made allows the selection of one or two partners (see chart below), that player may now select these partners. The specific number allowed to be selected is directly dependant on the specific score he bid.
- If he bid 3 tricks, he is allowed to select one partner.
- A bid of 4 or 5 tricks entitles him to select two partners.
- If bidding 8 or 15, the player must play solo (no partners).
The maker may select any such other player or players as his partner, regardless of their position at the table.
Once selected, play then begins with the player to the current dealers immediate left leading the first card to the first trick. The play of the hand is identical to standard four hand Euchre. The scoring for the hand, and the specific requirements to make the contract are as per the following table:

   Bid   Won Tricks NeededNumber of Partners AllowedAdditional Conditions
331May use Widow
442May use Widow
552May use Widow
85NoneMay use Widow
155NoneMay not use Widow
If the player is able to win using the conditions for his bid, he and his partners each score the amount of his bid . If he does not score the number (or more) each opponent scores the bid number.

Six Hand Auction Euchre: This variation is similar to five hand Auction Euchre with the following exceptions:
All other rules are the same as that with five handed auction Euchre.

Seven Hand Auction Euchre: This game is also played very similarly to five handed auction Euchre with a few exceptions, as follows:
In all other aspects, seven hand auction Euchre is played identically to the five hand version.

Auction Euchre with Jokers: Any of the versions of auction Euchre described above can be played with the addition of one joker. When played with this joker, the rules are essentially the same, with a few differences:
- The Joker ranks as the highest trump card. The remainder of the trump suit and the other suits, all rank as in standard Euchre.
- The widow in the seven hand variant consists of four vice three cards. The maker, if using the widow, would then discard any four cards after taking the widow into his hand.

The holder of the highest card of the called suit becomes the makers partner for the hand. Call Ace Euchre: This variation can be played by four to six players. However partnerships are not determined before the start of the deal as this information will be unknown until well into the hand.

The cards are dealt as in the standard four hand version as well as the determination of trump suit. However when examining his hand a player will not yet be sure who might end up being his partner should he become the maker.
Once the Maker is determined using the same method as in standard Euchre, he then names any suit (it need not be the suit designated as trump for the hand). Whichever other player (unbeknownst to the maker) who has the highest ranked card in the named suit becomes the makers partner. However, this player, should he even be aware that he is the actual holder of the highest card of the named trump does not state this or make this known in any way at the current time. Thus it will not be immediately known who the makers partner is until later in the hand (or possibly not until the end of the hand).

The scoring in Call Ace Euchre is the same as in the standard version, however, since the partnerships are liable to change each hand, each independent player in the temporary partnership is awarded the score that would normally be awarded to the partnership as a whole. The first individual player to reach or exceed the designated total for game is declared the winner. If two players reach this same total at the end of the hand, they are considered co-winners of the hand.

Bald Euchre Bald Euchre: Bald Euchre is an exciting variation that was developed and first played about 15 years ago in Southern California. It is unique, featuring several differences from the parent game.

The primary difference in this game is the handling of the Left Bower. Whereas in standard Euchre the Left Bower is considered to simply be an additional card of the selected trump suit, in Bald Euchre, the Left Bower is considered to be part of its actual marked suit. It is played by the holder as a member of the suit actually displayed on the face of the card, but is still considered a trump card with its normal ranking (between the right Bower and the Ace of the actual selected trump suit).
As an example, if Spades was the selected trump suit, the Left Bower would be the Jack of Clubs, retaining is normal ranking right below the Jack of Spades. However, the card could be played to a Club lead as a member of the suit of Clubs. Being a Trump, this card would be considered the highest card of the Club suit beating any other clubs played as well as any lower valued trump suit cards which might also be played to the trick. It would not be permissible to play that card to a Spade lead unless the holder had no other Spades in hand, in which case he could play the card and it would retain its trump ranking for purposes of card values in the trick.

Another difference between Bald Euchre and the standard game is in the procedure used if the turned up card designating the trump suit is rejected by all four players. Instead of a round of bidding as in standard Euchre, in Bald Euchre, the dealer then turns up a second card from the pack, placed directly on top of the previously exposed card. Each player, starting again with the player to the dealers immediate left, has an opportunity to accept the trump suit or turn it down. As in the first card turned up, if anyone (including the dealer) accepts the turned up card, the dealer may (but is not required to) exchange this exposed trump card for any card in his hand, placing his discard face down under the unused remainder of the deck. This turning up of an additional card can continue until the turned up card's suit is accepted for the trump suit or the suit of the turned up card is repeated. If a duplicate suit does appear, the bidding procedure immediately begins, at which time the players participate in the bidding round as in the standard game, the bidding starting with the player to the dealers immediate left. However, no suit which was turned down may be declared as the trump suit for this hand. If all suits were previously exposed with no player accepting it or all players pass during bidding, the cards are thrown in, shuffled, and a new deal is performed by the next dealer in turn. In all other aspects, this game is played the same as the base game Euchre.

Club Trump Suit in Hasenpfeffer
Example of Clubs as Trump Suit in Hasenpfeffer.
Hasenpfeffer: Hasenpfeffer is another fun variation of Euchre that is played with a 25 card deck by four players in two partnerships. The deck for this variant is created using the normal Euchre deck (which consists of a stripped down standard deck), but also includes the addition of one Joker. The rank of the cards is similar to standard Euchre with the only difference being the Joker. In Hasenpfeffer, the Joker is always considered to be the highest card in the trump suit. Thus, in the trump suit, the ranking is as follows: Joker, Jack of trump suit (right bower), Jack of opposite suit from trump suit (left bower), Ace, King, Queen, 10, 9 (of trump suit). Even though the left bower and Joker are not actually marked with the suit of the trump suit, they are considered, for all purposes to be members of the Trump suit. In the non trump suit of the same color as the trump suit the card ranking is: Ace, King, Queen, 10, 9. This other suit of the same color is called the opposite suit. In the two non-trump suits of the opposite color, the ranking is; Ace, King, Queen, Jack, 10, 9.

Determination of partners, seating positions and first dealer are the same as in standard Euchre. The deal is somewhat different, however. The dealer deals six face down cards to each player, in packets of thee cards at a time in a clockwise rotation around the table. The last card is then placed face down in the center of the table as a widow.

After the deal, bidding begins with the player to the immediate left of the dealer and continues in a clockwise rotation around the table with each player passing or bidding the number of tricks they believe their partnership can win (up to a maximum of six). Each player mush either bid a higher number than any previously bid or pass. After three consecutive passes after a bid, the player making the high bid becomes the bidder and earns the privilege of naming the trump suit for the hand.

If all players pass, the player who holds the Joker must then bid three and becomes the bidder. This also gives the player the privilege of naming the trump suit for the hand. However, when all players initially pass, and no player holds the Joker (it being the widow card), all the cards are thrown in with no score and the next dealer in turn deals the next hand.

After determining the Player, the high bidder then takes the one card widow, into his hand and discards any card from his hand face down. This card is set aside and takes no further part in this hand.

The player to the immediate left of the dealer leads the first card to the first trick and each subsequent player in turn must play a card of the suit led. If he has no card of that suit, he may play any card from his hand including a trump. Thus, each trick would consist of one card played per player. The highest trump card played to a trick wins the trick. If no trump cards were played to the trick, the highest card of the suit led wins it. The winner of each trick leads the first card to the next trick with the other players playing to the trick in the standard clockwise order.

If the partnership consisting of the high bidder and his partner manage to win as many tricks (or more) than their high bid, they score one point per trick won. If they are unable to score at least as many tricks as their bid, they lose one point for every trick they have won in the hand. Negative scores are possible and quite common in Hasenpfeffer. The defending partnership always wins one point per trick won during the hand whether the high bidders reach their bid or not. The scores for each hand are counted at the end of the hand, with the bidders score calculated first. This detail may be important, as if both sides reach or exceed the winning total on the same hand, the bidders side would be declared the winner as their score is calculated first, regardless of the defenders potential score on the hand. The first partnership to score 10 points over any number of hands wins the game.

How to Play Pepper Pepper: This game is similar to Hasenpfeffer in most respects with a few key differences which will be described. The first difference is that in Pepper, the Joker is not added to the deck, thus resulting in a 24 card deck with the same ranking (minus the Joker) as in Hasenpfeffer. In addition, no widow card is dealt to the center of the table.

When playing this variation, the bidding is also somewhat different than the parent game. In Pepper, the maximum normal bid is five (as in standard Euchre), however two additional bids are also allowed. These additional bids are called "Big Pepper" and "Little Pepper". Little Pepper is a bid to win all six tricks using normal stakes. A bid of Big Pepper is a bid to win all six tricks with double stakes for the hand. As expected, a bid of Little Pepper exceeds a bid of five or lower and the Big Pepper bid exceeds any bid of Little Pepper or lower. Once a player passes, he may no longer make further bids in the current hand and must pass on each subsequent bid during the current hand.

Rather than naming one of the four trump suits, the high bidder also has an alternative option. Instead of naming a particular suit as trump, he may instead declare the hand be played at No Trump. In this case no trump suit will be used for the hand, and all suits rank in the expected order; Ace, King, Queen, Jack, 10, 9. The game continues until one side earns 30 total points. If both partnerships earn 30 or more on the same hand, the team with the higher total wins. If this is also a tie, the winning bidders side on the last hand is declared the winner. In all other respects Pepper is played the same as Hasenpfeffer.

Double Hasenpfeffer: This is another fun Euchre variant that is commonly played in Pennsylvania Dutch country. Although somewhat different from Hasenpfeffer, Double Hasenpfeffer is sometimes also called just Hasenpfeffer.

Two identical cards played to the same trick
When two cards of the same suit are played to a trick, the first played is considered the higher card.
Double Hasenpfeffer (also called Hawsey, Hausey and sometimes Double Bid Euchre) is played using a 48 card Pinochle deck. This deck consists of two of each card in each suit in the following denominations; Ace, King, Queen, Jack, 10, 9. The ranking of the cards in this game is identical to that in the standard game of Euchre (including the Bowers in the trump suit). The game is designed to be played by four players, playing in the usual two partnerships of two players each. The players should be seated in such a way around the table such that players of both partnerships alternate. Determination of partnerships and first dealer can be done using any of the standard methods. Once the first dealer is determined, he deals the entire deck, such that each player ends up with twelve cards. He deals in a clockwise rotation around the table, usually distributing the cards in packets of four face-down cards at a time to a player.

The bidding then begins with the player to the dealers immediate left. The minimum bid is six and a player must pass or bid a higher number then any previous bid. A players bid equates to the minimum number of tricks a player thinks his partnership can win. Each player has one opportunity to bid with the player who stated the highest bid then naming the trump suit. This bidder and his partner become the "Bidders" for the hand. If a player thinks he can win all 12 tricks in the hand he may bids 12, instantly becoming the high bidder. The player bidding 12 then has the privilege of exchanging any two cards in his hand for his partners two best cards. He does this immediately after declaring the trump suit for the hand. He must then play the hand solo against the two opponents. His partner would simply discard his own hand face down on the table after the card exchange.

The play of the hand is very similar to standard Euchre with the first lead being made by the high bidder, and each player, in turn, playing one card to the trick. A player must play a card of the suit led if able. If the player does not have a card of the suit led, he may play any card from his hand, including a card of the trump suit. The highest trump card played to a trick wins it, but if no trump have been played to the trick, the highest card of the suit led wins the trick. In the instance where two cards of identical suit and rank are played to the same trick the first of the two played to the trick would be considered the higher card. The winner of each trick leads the first card to the next trick.

If the partnership (or solo player in the case of a bid of 12) is able to win at least as many tricks as bid during the hand, they earn one point per trick won during the hand. If a lone player is able to win at least as many as their winning bid, their side earns two points per trick won. If a partnership does not win at least as many tricks as bid, they lose 12 points (one point per trick in the deal). Negative scores are possible in this game. The defending partnership scores one point for each trick they win during the hand. The scores are counted at the end of the hand, with the bidders partnership counting first. The first team to earn 52 or more points is declared the winner of the game.

Six Player Double Hasenpfeffer: Double Hasenpfeffer can also be played by six participants in two partnerships consisting of three players each. The partners should sit around the table in such a manner that the play will alternate between players from each partnership during the play of the hand. The game is played identically to four player Double Hasenpfeffer, however, each player would receive only 8 cards in each hand. Thus, the maximum bid would be 8 and any player bidding 8 would play solo, and allowed to exchange any two cards to each partner for the two best cards that partner possesses. All other rules are identical to the standard four player version of the same game.

Example Progresive Euchre Tally
Example tally card for a Two Table session of Progressive Euchre.
Progressive Euchre: Progressive Euchre is not so much a variation on the game itself but rather a method by which a larger group of players could compete in a session of Euchre or even hold a small tournament. Progressive Euchre thus accommodates multiple tables of Euchre (with the standard four players per table) to be played simultaneously.

In Progressive Euchre, at each table, 4 deals are performed, with each player at the table dealing one time. The first dealer can be determined using the normal method and the rules for playing these four deals are the same as in standard Euchre with the exception that there is no limit to the total points a partnership can accumulate during the course of the four deals. Once the four deals are completed at every table, the players would then record their scores for the game and move to the next predetermined table and seat, resetting their score to 0 for the next game. This movement is detailed on a tally card that should be given to each player before the session begins. These tally cards can be distributed in some random fashion or assigned by the session leader. Before this distribution, each tally card should be marked with a player number (1 to 8 for two tables or 1 to 12 for 3 tables). The following links contain printable versions of the two and three table tally cards for playing Progressive Euchre: Two Table Tally, Three Table Tally.

Before distribution of the tally cards, the session leader should print a different player number on each. Thus, each tally card would then contain a players assigned number as well as details the movement of all players from game to game. Other than the player number, each tally card would be identical at the start of the game session. The card also contains space for the players name, score and opposing partnerships score for each game. This information is filled in as the individual rounds are completed. Progressive Euchre is usually played with two or three tables, but can sometimes be extended to four or even more tables (which leads to a longer running session). The following charts show the normal player movements for two and three tables of Progressive Euchre:

Two Table Arrangement          Three Table Arrangement
GamePlayers - Table 1Players - Table 2
11-6 vs 2-53-8 vs 4-7
22-3 vs 5-81-4 vs 6-7
31-8 vs 3-62-7 vs 4-5
41-2 vs 3-45-6 vs 7-8
51-7 vs 2-83-5 vs 4-6
62-6 vs 3-71-5 vs 4-8
72-4 vs 6-81-3 vs 5-7
          
GamePlayers - Table 1Players - Table 2Players - Table 3
11-2 vs 3-45-6 vs 7-89-10 vs 11-12
22-6 vs 3-117-9 vs 8-101-5 vs 4-12
34-11 vs 7-122-9 vs 3-81-6 vs 5-10
42-12 vs 5-93-7 vs 4-81-11 vs 6-10
51-7 vs 4-103-9 vs 5-112-8 vs 6-12
63-10 vs 5-121-8 vs 2-74-9 vs 6-11
76-8 vs 9-112-4 vs 10-121-3 vs 5-7
83-6 vs 7-101-4 vs 9-122-11 vs 5-8
91-10 vs 8-113-12 vs 6-92-5 vs 4-7
101-12 vs 6-74-5 vs 10-112-3 vs 8-9
111-9 vs 7-112-10 vs 3-54-6 vs 8-12
The players should be seated at the table in such a manner that the partners are seated opposite each other. Each row of the appropriate table above shows the partnerships for each round. The player listed in the first position for each table and round would deal the first hand of each game. Thereafter the deal would rotate in a clockwise rotation around the table. After the full number of games are played, the player with the highest cumulative score for the entire session would be declared the overall session or tournament winner.
 
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