How to Play Le Truc

Le Truc (or just Truc) is a trick taking game from the 15th century which originated in Spain. The game allows and even encourages partners to signal to each other via certain gestures to indicate the cards they have in their hand. Although this game is centuries old, it is still widely played in many parts of Spain and France. Newer and more complex versions of the game are also widely played in other locations, particularly Brazilian Truco, and are described in the variations section below.

The standard version of Le Truc is designed to be played by four players in two partnerships. The partners should be seated across from each other at the table. The game uses a 32 card deck which consists of a normal 52 card deck with all cards six and lower removed. The ranking of the cards in this modified deck is as follows (from high to low); 7, 8, Ace, King, Queen, Jack, 10, 9. Determination of partnerships and first dealer can be done in the following way. Each player would draw a card from a shuffled deck with the players drawing the two lowest playing in partnership against the players drawing the two highest. The player drawing the highest card would be the first dealer. Being of Spanish origin, the play, deal and rotation of the deal all move in a counterclockwise rotation in this game.

The dealer begins by shuffling the cards and offering the deck to his left hand opponent to cut. After the cut, the dealer distributes the cards one at a time in rotation until each player has a total of three. During each hand, one member of each partnership is given the special role of Governor for the hand. For the dealers partnership, the dealer is the Governor and for the opponent team, the player to the dealer's immediate right is the Governor. The Governor has certain responsibilities and privileges during the hand which will be described.

A spoilt trick in Le Truc
A trick in which the highest card is tied is spoilt and won by no one (in this case the highest cards are the two eights played to the trick)
After the deal the players examine their hands. The Governor of the non-dealers partnership may suggest a redeal and if the Governor for the dealers partnership agrees, all cards are set aside and each player receives a new hand of three cards. This may only be requested once per hand.

The player to the immediate right of the dealer leads the first card to the first trick and each other player, in a counterclockwise rotation plays one card to the trick. After all players have played to the trick, it is won by the highest ranked card played to the trick. If the highest card played to the trick is tied by players from opposing partnerships, the trick is "spoilt" and is won by no one. The winner of each trick leads the first card to the next. In the case of a spoilt trick, the player who led to the last trick leads to the next. When the trick is won by a partnership, but both players played a card of the same denomination to the trick, the player who played the first of the two cards leads to the next trick.

Before leading a card on his turn, a player may offer to increase the score for the hand by asking "Two More?". The Governor of the opposing team then has the option to accept the increase or refuse. Refusing the increase indicates they concede the hand, with the opposing partnership scoring the current value of the hand (with or without previous increases). Accepting the offer increases the current score for the hand and the hand continuing. With no increases, a hand earns one point to the partnership who wins it. The following table shows the possible score increases during a hand:
IncreaseScoring value for the hand
No Increase - Base Hand Value1
First Increase2
Second Increase4
Third Increase6
Fourth Increase8
Fifth Increase10
Sixth Increase12
A player may also on his turn, before leading a card, request "Mon Reste", which means "My Remainder". If accepted, the winner of this hand also wins the game. Refusal of this request, terminates the hand with the requesting player earning the current number of points the hand is set at.

The winning partnership of a particular hand is that which is able to win two of the three tricks. In the event of spoilt tricks, additional rules apply. If two tricks are spoilt, the partnership who won any trick during the hand is the winner. If both partnerships win exactly one trick (with one being spoilt), the partnership to win the first of the two tricks wins the hand. If all three tricks are spoilt, the partnership who led the first card of the first trick during the hand is considered to have won the hand.

During the hand, the partner of the Governor may use special signals to indicate the cards he has in his hand. The Governor, may then give his partner a basic instruction (such as play your Ace or play your highest card) which must be clearly heard by all players. All signals made must be accurate and the Governors partner must abide by a play requested by the Governor. The following are the normally used signals in this game:
SignalMeaning
Player GrinsI have a Seven
Player WinksI have an Eight
Player ShrugsI have an Ace
The first partnership to score 12 or more points is declared the winner of the game. Most players use a rubber system, with the first partnership to win two of three games becoming the winner of the rubber.



Variations of Truc

Le Truc for two Players

One of the original versions of Le Truc often played was a version for two players. The two player version is played identically to the partnership version with the following exceptions.

Obviously, each player plays and scores for himself unlike the partnership version of the game. The deal alternates between the two players from hand to hand. The non-dealer leads to the first trick with the winner of each trick leading to the next. If all three tricks are spoilt, the non-dealer is said to win the hand.

Trut:

Trut is a rare, French variant of Le Truc. The deck used for the card game Trut is somewhat different than that used for Le Truc. The 32 card deck used for this game consists of one card in each of the normal four suits in the following denominations: Ace, King, Queen, Jack 10, 9, 8, 7. The ranking of these cards used for the game are as follows (from high to low): 8, 7, Ace, King, Queen, Jack, 10, 9. This game is usually played by four players in two partnerships of two players each, but is also sometimes played by two individual players. When played by two players the rules are identical other than the obvious difference of there being no partnerships.

Selection of partnerships is usually done by all players drawing a card, with the players drawing the two highest cards playing as partners against the players drawing the two lowest cards. The player who draws the highest card of all is set as the first dealer. If two or more players draw cards of the same denomination, those players originally drawing those tied cards should replace the card and draw new ones until drawing a card not equal to any other players drawn card. Each player should sit directly across the table from his partner.

After determination of partners and first dealer, the dealer shuffles the deck and offers it to the player to his right to cut. After the cut, the dealer deals each player three face down cards in a clockwise direction, one card at a time, starting with the player to his immediate left.

The player to the dealer's left then leads the first card to the first trick. Each other player in a clockwise direction then plays one card to the trick. They may play any remaining card from their hand to the trick. The highest card played to the trick wins the trick. If the highest card played to the trick is tied by two players from different partnerships the trick is a draw and won by no one (called patte). The winner of each trick leads the first card to the next trick. In the event of a patte, the leader from the previous trick leads again to the next trick. If both players in a partnership which wins the trick have played equally ranked cards to that trick, the player of the first of the high cards leads to the next trick.

The first partnership to win two of the three tricks in a hand wins the hand (called a Trut), scoring one point. If two tricks of the hand are patte, the partnership winning the third trick wins he hand. If each partnership wins one trick and the third is tied, the partnership winning the first of the two tricks wins the hand. If all three tricks are patte, neither partnership wins the hand and no one scores the point for the hand.

During the hand, any player at any time during play of the hand, may request a Trut. This is a request to raise the current value of the hand. If accepted by the opponents, the current value of the hand is set at 3 points, which is earned by the winner of the hand. If declined, the hand ends and the partnership requesting the Trut earns 1 point.

If one team currently has two points and the opposing team less than two, the opposing partnership must request a Trut on the next hand (called a forced Trut).

If both teams at the beginning of a hand each have 2 points, the players can request additional cards be dealt. After the initial deal, the dealer asks the first player in turn if they would like to receive additional cards. If the player indicates they would like to receive cards, the dealer continues the question around the table. If all players, including himself indicates they would prefer to receive additional cards, the dealer than asks the first player, How many? That player may request from one to three cards which the dealer provides. Each player in turn then receives the same number of cards. After this distribution, the dealer again asks each player in turn if they would prefer to receive additional cards. If all agree, he again asks the first player how many and distributes the appropriate amount to each player. This continues until one or more players indicates they do not prefer to receive additional cards. At this time, each player discards enough cards face down from their hand to leave them with a three card hand. After this, the play of the hand then begins, with a Trut automatically assumed for the hand.

Once a team scores three points, they are said to have won one Trut. The teams then reset their point scores to zero to begin the next Trut. The first team to win seven Truts is said to be the winner of the game.

Truco

A number of fairly recently developed games that are similar to Le Truc are often played, particularly in Spain and areas of South America, under the name Truco. These include some of the following currently popular games:

Brazilian Truco (Truco Miniero):

Truco Miniero is one of the most popular members of the Truco family of games. This game is widely played in many portions of South America, particularly in Brazil. The game itself originated from similar games played in Spain and is regularly played there as well as many other locations. This exciting and fast moving game encourages players to generate certain signals to indicate to their partner specific cards to play and gameplay can sometimes be quite noisy and seemingly very chaotic.

Truco is played by four participants, divided into two partnerships consisting of two players each. Truco uses a reduced 40 card deck which can be created from a standard deck of 52 cards. This deck is comprised by removing all Eights, Nines and Tens from a regular deck. The ranking of the cards in the Truco deck are as follows, from high to low:

4 of Clubs, 7 of Hearts, Ace of Spades, 7 of Diamonds, Threes, Twos, Remaining Aces (Ace of Clubs, Diamonds and Hearts), Kings, Jacks, Queens, Remaining Sevens (7 of Spades and Clubs), Sixes, Fives, Remaining Fours (4 of Spades, Hearts and Diamonds).

Other than the four highest ranking cards, cards of the same numerical designation are considered to be of equal rank for purposes of winning a trick.
Eight Highest Ranking card denominations in Truco Miniero
The illustration shows the top eight ranking card denominations in Truco Miniero from left to right

Because communication between partners is of vital importance during the play of the hand, in Truco, partnerships are often pre-arranged before the game. However, if this is not the case, partners can be determined by having all players draw a card from the shuffled deck. The two players drawing the highest cards would play as partners against the players drawing the two lowest. In the event cards of the same rank are drawn (as per the normal card ranking for Brazilian Truco) those participants would draw new cards. Determination of the first dealer can also be performed in the same manner, with all players drawing a card from the face down shuffled deck. The player drawing the highest card would become the dealer for the first hand. Thereafter the deal rotates counter-clockwise around the table. Partners should sit at the table in such a way that each player is seated directly across from their partner.

The object of this game is to be the first team to score 12 points over the course of one or more hands. The team who reaches or exceeds 12 points at any point in the game are instantly declared the winners. Players can earn these points during a hand in several ways; Winning of tricks, having the best combination of same suited cards (or single card) or lastly, by requesting an increase that the opposing team refuses.

Traditionally the score in many versions of Truco was recorded using seeds from a plant native to the area as counters kept in a basket or other small receptacle. However tokens or chips can also be used effectively. Whatever is used, an ample supply should be on hand, stored in a container or pile off to the side. As players earn scores, the counters are taken from the container and displayed in front of one of the players in the partnership to indicate their current score.

Rotation of play and the deal in Truco Miniero To begin the game, the dealer, called the Pie or Foot, shuffles the deck, the player to his left cuts, and the dealer distributes three face down cards to the player at his immediate right, called the Mano or Hand. The Mano then picks up his hand and after examining it has three options:
  1. He may elect to discard these cards, called Burning. If he elects to do this, the three cards are placed face up in the center of the table. After all players have seen their denomination, the cards are set aside and not used for the remainder of this hand.
  2. The Mano may pass these cards to his partner. He passes the face down packet of cards across the table to his partner, which becomes that player's hand.
  3. The Mano may keep these cards which then become his hand.
If the Mano elected to discard his cards or pass them to his partner, three more face down cards are dealt to him by the Pie. The Mano then again has the same options. However, if he has already passed a hand to his partner during this hand, he may not select this option again. In addition, the player may not burn or discard more than three groups of cards during the hand, passing (if this option has not yet been used during the hand) or keeping the next group.

After the Mano indicated he will keep his hand, the dealer then distributes the remainder of the hands in a counterclockwise direction, starting with his partner. If the Mano, had passed cards to his partner, that player is skipped in the deal as they already have a hand. Each player should end up with a three card hand.

After these dealing procedures are complete, the Mano or Hand, begins play by playing the first card to the first trick. Each subsequent player then plays one face up card to the trick as well in a counter-clockwise direction. The player who plays the highest ranked card to the trick (regardless of suit) wins the trick. If two or more cards of the same rank are tied for the highest card in the trick (i.e. two Kings), and the cards are from different partnerships the trick is won by no one, called a draw or parda. If the tied cards are all from the same team, that team wins the trick. In parda situations, the player who led to the first trick of the current hand leads to the next trick as well. This continues until all three tricks have been played during the hand. All played tricks remain in the center of the table until the end of the current hand. The winner of each trick leads the first card to the next trick.

At a players option they may play their card to a trick face down. When doing this, the face down card cannot win the trick, but might be done in a circumstance where a player does not want his opponents to determine other cards in the hand. However, a player may never play a card face down in the first trick of the hand.

A partnership that manages to win two of the three tricks in the hand is considered to have won the hand. This earns that partnership one point. If a team wins the first two tricks, the last trick is usually not played since the hand has already been decided. If, after the three tricks have been played, each partnership has won one trick (due to one trick ending in a parda), the team who won the first of the two tricks during the hand earns the score for the round. If there were two tricks ending in pardas during the hand, the partnership who has won one trick during the hand earns the point. If all three tricks during the hand ended in a parda, the partnership consisting of the player who led the first card in the hand wins the point.

During the hand, the players have the option to increase the point value for the hand by requesting a Truco.

Truco: Any active player in the hand can state Truco at his turn of play, before playing his card to the current trick. Either member of the opposing partnership then has the option to accept the increase (quiero) or reject the increase (no quiero). Accepting the increase indicates that the winner of the current trick instantly scores three points. However, if either opponent rejects the increase, the hand instantly ends with the partnership consisting of the player who stated Truco earning the one point for the hand.

ReTruco: If there has already been an accepted Truco during the current hand, either of the members of the opposing team can state Retruco. This is a request to increase the point value for the current trick by three more points. If accepted, the hand continues and the winner of the current tricks receives the newly raised value. However, if refused the partnership of the team last stating Retruco earns the previous value of the hand. Further Retrucos can continue until the trick value is raised to 12 points, the maximum (which also wins the game). Each Retruco must be requested by the opposing team who called the last Retruco on the trick.

In the event a Truco was called and accepted, the hand ends after the current trick is completed, with the winning team scoring the indicated number of points. If, at any stage in the Truco procedures, the opponents refuse the Truco, the team requesting the Truco earn the current number of points. A Truco can only be accepted (and not Retrucoed) when enough points could be earned by the acceptance to win the game.

If Truco was accepted and the hand ends in a parda, the winner is determined based on the cards already played to the current trick. If a card of the highest denomination was played to the trick before Truco was requested, the team that last called Truco or Retruco loses the hand, with the opponents winning the current Truco value. If the highest card (or cards) to the trick were played after the Truco was requested, the trick is still considered a tie and the players must play the next trick to determine the winner. If this occurred on the last trick of the hand, the hand itself is a tie and neither team wins any score for the hand.

At the Top: There are special rules that govern the game when one or both partnerships have 11 points and thus are within one point of winning the game.

Gestures (Señas): As opposed to most other games, signalling to ones partner is allowed and common in this game. Thus, a large part of the game of Truco consists of signalling to your partner the cards you contain. The players attempt to do this in such a way to convey specific information to their partner without the opponents detecting it. Thus, a system of gestures (called Señas) have been developed to assist in this endeavor. The players may create their own, but the following are those that are widely accepted and used:
Manillas example in Truco Paulista
If the exposed card was an Ace, the Manillas would be the two of Clubs, two of Hearts, two of Spades and two of Diamonds, ranked in that order.
Brazilian Truco (Truco Paulista):

Truco Paulista is another common version of Truco played in Brazil usually in the Sao Paolo region. The game is played almost identically to Truco Miniero in all respects with the sole difference being the ranking of the cards in the Truco deck which changes slightly from hand to hand.

After the hand has been dealt, the top card of the remaining stack is exposed in the center of the table. The ranking of the top four cards in the deck for this hand would be the four cards of the denomination directly higher than that of the card exposed, from the following base ranking (From High to Low); 3, 2, Ace, King, Jack, Queen, 7, 6, 5, 4. If the turned up card is a 3 (the highest card in the base ranking), the four highest ranked cards would be the 4's. These cards are called the Manillas. Amongst these four highest ranked cards, the suits of the card indicates its relative rank, in the following order (from high to low): Clubs, Hearts, Spades then Diamonds. All other cards rank in their normal place within the base ranking (skipping over the normal positioning of the highest ranked denomination). Other than in the highest denomination cards, any other cards of the same rank are considered equal.

Brazilian Truco - Clean Deck:

In some cases, often in more formal settings and tournaments, Truco will be played with a reduced deck. This is called a clean deck, and consists of removing the following additional cards from the standard Truco deck: Seven of Spades, Seven of Clubs, All Sixes, All Fives, Four of Spades, Four of Hearts and Four of Diamonds.

Other than the smaller deck, this version of the game is played identically to either version of Brazilian Truco described above.

Argentine Truco:

Argentine Truco uses a special deck and is widely played in Argentina and some areas of Spain. This game is usually played with a special Spanish deck which is significantly different from the familiar French deck. This Spanish deck consists of four suits; Gold Coins, Cups, Swords and Batons. The royalty cards are also somewhat different, consisting of the following; Jack, Knight and King. Thus the Spanish deck used for this version of the game consists of the following card denominations; Ace, King, Knight, Jack, Seven, Six, Five, Four, Three, Two. The ranking of these cards is as follows, from high to low; Ace of Swords, Ace of Batons, Seven of Swords, Seven of Coins, all Threes, all Twos, remaining Aces (Ace of Cups, Ace of Coins), all Kings, all Knights, all Jacks, remaining Sevens (Cups and Batons), all Sixes, all Fives, all Fours. Other than the top four ranked cards, cards of the same denomination are considered to be of equal value with regards to winning a trick.

Argentine Truco is designed for four players in two partnerships. If the partnerships have not been pre-determined, the players can all draw cards from the shuffled deck. The players drawing the two highest cards play as partners against the two players drawing the two lowest. Players drawing cards of the same denomination (as per the card ranking for this game) should redraw until they pull a card that is not tied by any other player. Each player should sit directly across the table from their partner.

As in other variations of Truco, the goal of a partnership in each hand is to win two of the three tricks in a hand, thus scoring points for the hand. The player to the dealer's immediate right plays the first card to the first trick. Each other player in a counterclockwise direction then plays one card to the trick. The trick is won by the highest card played to the trick. If the two highest cards played to the trick are played by members of different teams, the trick is tied (parda) and neither partnership wins it. In the circumstances where each partnership wins one trick and one is parda, the winner of the hand is the partnership who won the first trick during this hand. If all three tricks are parda, the partnership of the player who led the first card to the first trick wins the hand. The winner of the previous trick leads the first card to the next trick. In the event of a parda, the player who led to the tied trick leads to the next one. The winner of each hand scores one point.

On a players turn, before he plays a card to the current trick, he may shout Truco. This is an offer to increase the value of the current hand to two points instead of one. Either member of the opposing team may either accept or refuse. If the increase is refused, the hand ends and the partnership who offered the Truco scores the current value of the hand (one point in this case). If they accept, the current trick is played out and the winner of this trick wins the hand, scoring the increased value. In addition to refusing or accepting, the opposing partnership may also respond with Retruco at the current time, or later during the same trick. Retruco is an offer to raise the score during the current hand to 3 total points. If the original partnership who shouted Truco accept, the hand is worth 3 points, which is won by the winner of the current trick. If they refuse, the partnership who offered the Retruco scores the current value of two points for the hand. In the event of a Retruco, the partnership who originally shouted "Truco" on the trick can make one last increase request, called Vale Cuatro. This is an offer to increase the value of the current hand to 4 points if accepted. If the opponents rejected, the hand ends and the partnership who offered the Vale Cuatro scores three points for the hand.

Envido: Argentine Truco also features an additional method of raising the point value potential for a hand, called Envido. Only the current Dealer and the player to his immediate left can make this call during a hand. When a call of Envido is made during the hand, the opposing partnership may respond in one of five ways, as follows:

Quiero: Accepts the challenge, which awards the team with the highest pair two points at the end of the hand.

Envido: Not only accepts the challenge, but offers to raise the points for the challenge to four points instead of two.

Real Envido: Accepts the original Envido challenger, but also offers to increase the point value for the challenge by three more points.

Falta Envido: Stating this accepts the Envido, but places additional emphasis on the value of the pairs held by the players (see below).

No Quiero: This can be stated after any Envido or request to increase the point value of the challenge. When this occurs, the last player to request an increase earns the current value of the last accepted increase in value (2, 4 or 5). If it was the original Envido that is declined, the partnership who originally requested the Envido in the hand receives one point.

Truco Envido example
As an example, if a player calls Envido, the next player calls another Envido, the next Real Envido and the last player calls Quiero. The winner of this Envido would earn 7 points.
After a response of No Quiero or Quiero, no additional calls of Envido, Real Envido or Falta Envido can be made during the current hand. Thus, a series of these requests will eventually end in a Quiero or No Quiero. If ending in a Quiero, a comparison of the most cards of the same suit held by the players is performed to determine who has the highest, earning that partnership the current accepted Envido agreed value. Each player, starting with the player who played the first card in the hand, then states the value of their highest two card combination of the same suit (called a pair in this game). The value of these cards are calculated as follows. A player adds the total value of cards in the same suit in his hand (usually this would be the suit the player has the most cards in) and adds 20 to that total. The following chart shows the various values of cards for determining these values:
CardValue in a Pair
King, Queen, Jack0
Ace1
2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8Face Value of Card
If the player does not have two or more cards of the same suit, they may simply use the value of their highest card, but may not add 20 when using a single card. If the player has three cards of the same suit, they would select the total of the highest two point scoring cards in their hand plus addition of a 20 point bonus to that total. When declaring his points, a player must accurately state the score of his highest such group. In calculating his score a player may use cards still in his hands as well as cards he may have already played to a trick during the current hand. A player may also concede the points for the Envido by stating "Son Buenas", which ends the procedures at once and the opponents scoring for the highest Envido. A player may also, however, make no claim and remain silent if his partner already states his total and has the current highest Envido. However, if the next player calls a higher Envido than his partner, he must either state his own or state Son Buenas, conceding defeat for the Envido.

In the case of a Falta Envido that is accepted the partnership with the higher pair score instantly wins the game if both partners have less than 15 points. If one or both partnerships have a current score of more than 15, the partnership with the higher pair value earns as many points as the opposing partnership is short of 30 total points.

If two players from opposing teams tie for highest Envido, the first of the two stated totals wins for the Envido. At the conclusion of the hand, the player who won for having the highest Envido must show the cards which made up the Envido to verify his claim. Any player who says Envido during the game is automatically assumed to be requesting an Envido (or increasing the scoring value of one currently in progress), regardless if that is his true intention. Of course, if an Envido has already been played during the current hand, this does not apply.

In the event that a call of Envido and Truco are both said in quick succession or simultaneously, both calls are valid, but the Envido procedures occur before that of the Truco.

The first team to score 30 points wins the round, called a Chico. Often, chicos are played as a rubber, with the first team to win two of three chicos being declared the overall winner.

Flor:

A rule that is sometimes used in Argentine Truco and similar variants played in Spain is the Flor. Although Flor can also be used in the Brazilian versions of Truco it usually is not.

A Flor is having three cards of the same suit in a player's hand. A player so having this must, on his first turn, shout "Flor". In so doing, this player has the opportunity to score additional points on the hand. Declaring a Flor on a hand prohibits any use of Envido by any player during the same hand. If an Envido is already in progress, it is instantly canceled. Only players who actually have three cards of the same suit may declare or increase the point value for the Flor.

In the rare case that a member of the opposing partnership also has Flor, they must also announce it and can respond in one of three ways (with the announcement going in a counterclockwise direction from the first player to actually announce Flor):
  1. Con flor me achico: This is an acknowledgement that you also have Flor, but you surrender the score for the Flor to the opponent team. In stating this, the partnership who first stated "Flor" scores three points for the Flor and one additional point for the opponents surrender.


  2. Contraflor: This is an announcement that you also have a Flor and challenge the opponents. The opponents must then respond to the Contraflor. The response to the Contraflor can be one of three options:
    1. Con flor quiero: The partnership originally calling "Flor" accepts the challenge, with the team with the highest Flor winning 3 points per Flor announced by either team.
    2. Con flor me achico: This declaration indicates that the team accepts that the team who called Contraflor is entitled to score the three points for the Flor and one point for a surrender.
    3. Contraflor al resto: Announce your own Flor and request that the score for the winning Flor be raised to the exact value the currently winning team needs in order to win the Chico plus three points per Flor announced by either team. If the Contraflor al resto is declined, the partnership offering it scores 4 points.

  3. Contraflor al resto: This is an indication that the partnership also has a Flor and requests that the score be increased to the exact value needed by the winning team to win the Chico plus three for each Flor announced by both teams. When this declaration is made, the opponents can respond in three ways:
    1. Con flor quiero: Accepts the requested score increase for the Flor. The team having the highest Flor scores 3 points per Flor announced by either team.
    2. Con flor me achico: Surrenders the current Flor, allowing the opposing team to score 4 points total.
After all players have responded regarding Flors, and one partnership has not surrendered, the players then must announce the actual value of their Flor. Each player having such a Flor must then state the total point value of their Flor, starting with the player to the immediate right of the dealer. When announcing the value of his Flor, a player may instead state "Son Buenas", indicating that a Flor announced by a previous player is higher, conceding the Flor to that player. The scoring for Flors is similar to that with Envido. The three cards of the Flor are totalled together and an additional 20 points is added. Kings, Knights and Jacks are worth 0 points, Aces 1, and all other cards are worth the value printed on the card. The player with the highest Flor then wins the agreed upon amount upon completion of the hand (whether they actually win the play of the hand or not).

Example of Truco Flor
As an example, say the North player announces "Flor", the next player in turn states Contraflor, the next player passes and the original declarer states Con flor me achico. The team who stated Contraflor would then win 4 points total, 3 for their own Flor and one for the opponents surrender of the Flor increase.
After play of the Flor, the regular game then continues. At the end of the hand, the player announcing the highest valued Flor must also show it to prove his claim. Similar to the procedures for Envido, a Flor takes precedence over a Truco, and the Flor announcements must occur before returning to any in progress Truco call.

A player who has a Flor may also decline to announce it, however they risk a score penalty to their partnership. At the end of any hand, any opponent who suspects a specific opponent may have such an unannounced Flor may call "Pido Flor". The challenged player must show the cards that were in their hand. If they did in fact have a Flor for which they did not announce for, the accusing team instantly scores three points. However, if they did not have a Flor the partnership of the accused player scores one point instantly.

As in all other commonly played versions of Truco, Argentine Truco players use a variety of gestures or signals to indicate what cards they have in their hand to their partner. The following are some that are commonly used with the Argentinean version of the game: Uruguayan Truco:

Another version of Truco which uses the special Spanish suited deck is Uruguayan Truco. This game is played identically to Argentine Truco with the following differences:

The major difference between this version and that played in Argentina is that in this version there is the determination of a special suit. The cards in this "suit" have additional capabilities during the game, particularly with regards to Flor and Envido. After each player has been dealt their hand, the next card from the stock is turned face up (for all players to see) and placed partially under the remainder of the stock. The suit of this card is identified as the "Muestra" for this hand. This muestra suit thus directly affects the ranking of the cards used for the hand. Thus, the ranking of the deck is as follows (from high to low): 2 of the muestra suit, 4 of muestra suit, 5 of muestra suit, Knight of muestra suit, Jack of muestra suit, Ace of Swords, Ace of Batons, Seven of Swords, Seven of Coins, all Threes, all Twos, remaining Aces (Aces of suits other than Swords, Batons or muestra suit), all Kings, all Knights, all Jacks, remaining Sevens (Seven of suits other than Swords or the muestra suit), all Sixes, all Fives, all Fours.

Certain cards in this muestra suit have additional capabilities that may affect play:
  1. Muestra King - If the faced up card was a Jack, Knight, Five, Four or Two, the King of the same suit of the turned card, when in a player's hand, is set as an exact replacement for the faced card. Thus, if the faced card was a Five, the King of the same suit would be considered for all purposes to have the same value as that muestra suit Five. However, if the faced card is a Three, Six or Seven, the King retains its standard value for ranking and with regards to an Envido or Flor.
  2. Muestra Jack - In regards to a Flor or Envido, this card can be considered to be of any suit and adds 7 points to a Flor or Envido.
  3. Muestra Knight - In a Flor or Envido, the Muestra Knight can be considered to be of any suit and adds 7 points to a Flor or Envido.
  4. Muestra Five - In a Flor or Envido, this card of the muestra suit can be considered to be of any suit and adds 8 points to a Flor or Envido.
  5. Muestra Four - In a Flor or Envido the Four of the muestra suit can be considered to be of any suit and adds 9 points to a Flor or Envido.
  6. Muestra Two - In regards to a Flor or Envido, the Muestra Two can be considered to be of any suit and adds 10 points to a Flor or Envido.
In all other respects, Uruguayan Truco is played identically to Argentine Truco. However, as many regional systems of gestures and signals have been developed, the following are some that are usually used with the Uruguayan version:
Two Player Truco:

All listed variations of Truco can also be played by two players. The rules of the actual game are identical to the partnership version with the obvious exception there are no partnerships, with each player playing for himself.

Truco for 6 or 8:

The various Truco versions are sometimes played by larger numbers of players, such as 6 or 8. In this case there are still two partnerships, however each partnership consists of more players. In the case of 6 players, each partnership contains 3 players and with 8 total participants, each partnership has 4 players. The game itself is played identically to the standard versions of Truco, with a few special circumstances which may arise due to the increased number of players:

- If the Envido rules are being used, the only players who may request Envido are the Pie (Foot) and the player to the immediate left of the foot.

In Pica Pica, three separate two player games are played - Sometimes, with 6 players Pica Pica is played. When playing Pica Pica, there are still two teams of three players, however, one member of each team plays a two player variant of the game (described above) against one member of the opposing team. At the completion of each hand, the totals for the games of all players on the same team are summed together to determine the current total for that team. A game is usually played to 30 total points.

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